Wolf Pass – Steve Thayer

852211Wolf Pass
by Steve Thayer

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

May 31, 2017  


Having found this book on a shelf in a private cottage in Tobermory, I was pleasantly surprised. I’d never heard of Steve Thayer, although he’s reportedly a N.Y. Times bestselling author.
For anyone who is looking for suspense thriller that’s not a cookie-cut tale like many of Patterson’s, this novel is a good read.
The story jumps back and forth from Nazi occupied Germany to the Kennedy assassination era, with a Deputy Sheriff from Wisconsin narrating the tale.
The characters are interesting and the plot keeps you guessing until the end. I thoroughly enjoyed this book.

Alert – Patterson/Ledwidge

24396884Alert (Michael Bennett, #8)
by James Patterson (Goodreads Author), Michael Ledwidge

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

May 24, 2017  
Although I think Michael Ledwidge is good enough to break away from James Patterson and write on his own, this wasn’t one of my favorites by the author. And though I like his Michael Bennett character I find it completely ridiculous that a high profile NYPD detective would have ten kids. Having said that the story is interesting and fast-paced, but perhaps cliche in some parts. Don’t get me wrong, I think the book is a good read, but I expect better from best selling authors.

Rino’s Kitchen & Ale House

Carbonara

Formerly the Nesbitt Inn, Rino’s Kitchen and Ale House is a small restaurant on the fringe of downtown Windsor that is big on character and flavor. Meals are served inside a one hundred year old stately brick home on Elliott Street at Pelissier. It’s far enough from the bar scene to have ample parking right next door.

Chef Rino Bortolin proudly uses local ingredients for his ever-changing menu, and he offers local craft beer and wine. His prices are fair and offerings range from burger to lamb shank. The atmosphere is cozy and casual. In the warmer weather tables are set up outside on the deck and sometimes in the back yard.

Continue reading “Rino’s Kitchen & Ale House”

Skip “The Dinner”

imagesThe Dinner is the first movie we’ve walked out on in a long time. The trailer made it look interesting. Maybe we should have read the reviews. I only noticed now that it received NO STARS. We couldn’t agree more.  The movie was as stupid as its title.

After twenty minutes we looked at each other and commented how it was slow and boring. Around forty-five minutes into the yawner we considered leaving, but we thought we’d take the chance that something would happen any minute. Wrong.

We left the theater after an hour, I was surprised to see that no one else followed suit. Even with Richard Gere and Laura Linney, the movie was actually painful to watch. Steve Coogan had the main roll and he had both of us squirming in our seats after only a few minutes of listening to him.

The plot hung there, somewhere, but we didn’t stick around to see it unfold. The point of the story was to see how far parents would go to protect their children after they did something completely stupid and horrific. I saw enough of real-life drama during my police career to know the answer to that question.

Cathryn and I give The Dinner a big fat 0!