The Escape – David Baldacci

20767918The Escape (John Puller, #3)
by David Baldacci

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Feb 18, 2016  


I thought this was a great book with an intriguing story and interesting characters. John Puller seems more believable than Jack Reacher.
My only complaint is that it was a bit long, and could have easily been trimmed shorter by eliminating repetition. It was my first novel by this author, but it won’t be my last.
1 like · 

7 is Magnificent

safe_image

The Western is still alive and kicking. The same can’t be said for the dozens of bad guys who go up against Denzel Washington and his hand-selected men with guns and knives and arrows for hire. Antoine Fuqua kept some of the lines from the 1960 original movie with Yul Brynner and Steve McQueen, but he changed up the story and the characters in the magnificent bunch. Movie goers will recognize most of the ensemble, but may have to search their memories for one character in particular.

The Magnificent Seven is a shoot-em-up western that is not for the faint of heart. For western movie fans, it’s got everything you’re looking for, and then some. The cinematography, stunt work, and special effects are top notch. I for one, appreciated that Fuqua didn’t have blood spewing all over the place, like Tarantino did in Jango. Some horses took nasty tumbles, but I’m sure the action was carefully regulated to protect the animals.

Although Denzel didn’t portray “Chris” as in the original and three sequels that featured Brynner and Lee Van Cleef, he personified a capable leader for his talented group of killers. And though the other characters were different than the originals, watch for similar traits. I mention this for those old enough to have seen The Magnificent Seven, or any of it’s three sequels. Even though Cathryn wasn’t crazy about all the killing, she thought the movie was well done. We give it a 9 our of 10.

In Harm’s Way -Doug Stanton

42435In Harm’s Way: The Sinking of the U.S.S. Indianapolis and the Extraordinary Story of Its Survivors
by Doug Stanton

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

 
Read from February 07 to 08, 2014

 

A truly amazing story.
It was well researched and written.
I can’t even begin to imagine what the survivors went through. Reading an account of their four days floating at sea with injuries, exposure to the elements and daily shark attacks was an emotionally gut wrenching experience.
The survivors of the U.S.S. Indianapolis are heroes in the truest sense.

The Bone Bed – Patricia Cornwell

13708346The Bone Bed (Kay Scarpetta, #20)
by Patricia Cornwell

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

 
Read from April 28 to May 11, 2014

 

Not my cup of tea.
For a best selling author I expected much more.
Ninety-five percent of the book was dialog, and half of the time I was confused as to who was saying what.
The story evolved at a good pace with great character development, but then it ended very abruptly.
It bothers my how many top authors today divide  chapters wherever they see fit…sometimes in the middle of a conversation, resulting in up to a hundred chapters with no rhyme or reason. Just saying.

Likely to Die – Linda Fairstein

1020956Likely To Die (Alexandra Cooper, #2)
by Linda Fairstein

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

I picked this book up in a small store in Italy, one of only a few English books there.
It was a pleasant surprise and a good read…a bit slow to start, but once I had an idea where the plot was going I had to finish it. The author was a real-life sex crimes prosecutor, who draws from her own experience to tell you a good story.
A very good read.
1 like · 

The Kill Room – Jeffrey Deaver

16051543The Kill Room (Lincoln Rhyme, #10)
by Jeffery Deaver

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Sep 18, 2016  · 

 

This is the first Jeffrey Deaver novel I’ve read, although I’ve seen the movie, The Bone Collector, based on another of his books.
For anyone who loves forensics and whodunits, this novel will more than satisfy your appetite. It was more of a spy thriller, than the serial killer story in Bone Collector.
I found the story a bit slow at first, but then it changed gears and I couldn’t put the book down. Deaver gives us lots of twists and turns making the good guys into bad guys, then flips it around to make you wonder who is good and who is bad.
Personally, I was let down by what I thought was an anti-climatic ending. It seemed like the story ended chapters earlier, but the author dragged it on to tidy things up.
Overall the book is very well written and it keeps you thinking and guessing until the end.

Eddie Murphy & The Golden Girls

100_3699

This story appears in my book,  A Casual Traveler

Kananchuburi Provence, Thailand 

      I booked a no-brainer trip from Pataya Beach to the Kananchuburi province in Thailand, near the Burma border. It is home to the Bridge on the River Kwai, that was made famous by the movie of the same name.  For those unaware, it’s where the Japanese used allied prisoners of war to build a railway bridge over the river, and through the mountain pass into Burma.

      The shuttle bus picked me up at my hotel at 5:30 a.m. sharp, a despicable time of the day. The birds weren’t up yet, but there were still a couple people drinking at the bar across the street. Not unusual in Pataya. I’d behaved the previous evening, opting for a movie at the local cinema, instead of being one of those people at the bar.

     I climbed into the van and saw with my one open eye that there were other people on the bus. Three older black women had nabbed the best seats. The looked like a darker version of the Golden Girls. I wedged myself in and didn’t pay the driver much attention, until he got lost two blocks from my hotel.

Continue reading “Eddie Murphy & The Golden Girls”